National Oil and Gas Talent Register to boost employment of Ugandans in the sector

The National Oil and Gas Talent Register (NOGTR) will boost employment of Ugandans in the nascent oil and gas sector, according to Mr. Ernest Rubondo, the Executive Director, Petroleum Authority of Uganda (PAU).

On 1st February, the Petroleum Authority of Uganda (PAU) launched the National Oil and Gas Talent Register. At the launch, Rubondo explained that the the talent register is open to all qualified Ugandans. Registration of Ugandans on the register started on February, 1, 2019. Rubondo added that the register is meant to boost local content and bridge gaps between employers and employees in the oil and gas sector.

“Registration is continuous and free of charge. However, this does not waive competition for the available jobs. There are over 400 job profiles on the National Oil and Gas Talent Register [NOGTR],” he added. Ugandans will be required to update their profiles once a year. “With a human resource register in place, we will be able to demand for a fair consideration for Ugandan employees because it will be easier to identify potential talent.” Rubondo added that the register will constitute a database of available human capacities and technical skills for the oil and gas sector in Uganda.
“The register has the demand and supply side users. The demand side users are the companies, Ministries, Government Departments and Agencies (MDAs) which meet the eligibility criteria and offer employment in the sector. On the supply side are individuals who meet eligibility criteria for the work force demands,” Rubondo explained.

The National Oil and Gas Talent Register promotes the employment of Ugandan Citizens in the sector. One of the areas the National Content Policy for the oil and gas sector provides for is building the capabilities of Uganda’s human resources. This is expected to ease the recruitment processes in the sector and minimize the use of expatriates. The National Oil and Gas Talent Register (NOGTR) is one of the initiatives of growing the participation of Uagndan citizens in the nascent oil and gas sector.

One of the key aspects of the Authority under the regulatory role is to ensure the growing participation of Ugandans in the sector. The Petroleum Authority of Uganda (PAU) is mandated under regulation 31 of the Petroleum (Exploration, Development and Production) (National Content), Regulations 2016 to establish, maintain and operate a National Human Capacity register herein referred to as the National Oil and Gas Talent Register (NOGTR).

The same Regulations compel companies involved in the oil and gas sector to ensure that Ugandan citizens are given priority for employment in any petroleum activity. The regulations also restrict issuance of work permits to expatriates.

The Ministry of Internal Affairs, according to the regulations can only issue a work permit after the Petroleum Authority has furnished evidence that there are no Ugandans on the national talent register qualified for the job. When work permits are granted to an expatriate, the oil companies are required to submit to the Authority for approval a succession plan for all positions not held by Ugandan citizens.

By Edward Ssekika
Edited by Flavia Nalubega

Artisanal and Small-scale Miners Abandon Mining in Namayingo: They Blame it on Depleted Gold Reserves

Artisanal miners in Namayingo district have abandoned gold mining sites due to diminishing gold deposits in the area. As a result, many remain unemployed as this activity was a source of income for majority residents in the district.
Mr. Mukose Ayub, a gold miner at Nakudi mining site in Banda Sub-County, Namayingo district explained that over the years, gold deposits have become very scarce, with a discovery rate of only about one gram of gold per day.
“Since 2014, we have been struggling. Today we get just about one gram after a day’s long work which costs only Ushs100,000/=. This cannot cater for our needs and business expenses.’
He says some miners have resorted to recycling residues which were left behind by other miners while many have been rendered jobless. Majority have resorted to venturing into other businesses thus abandoning mining.
According to Muganza Emmanuel, the District Natural Resources Officer of Namayingo, gold mining in the district has been a major source of employment for most youth within this area but the drastic fall in the number of youths operating in this area is quite alarming.
“Namayingo district has for more than 15 years employed close to 120,000 artisanal miners in the various gold mining sites at Banda, Buyinja and Sigulu sub-counties being involved in digging, panning and gold trade. To-date, the number has suddenly reduced to a total of 200 artisanal miners by 2019.” Muganza explained .
Budde mining site in Buyinja sub-county had a total of 200 artisanal miners but currently it has 35 artisanal miners, Buyanga mining site at Sigulu sub-county which had 200 artisanal miners currently has 40. Buheri mining site in Banda sub-county had over 100 but they are 50 while Nakuddi that had 6000 today has only 20 ASMs. Some of the gold sites have been fully vacated like Buchwanga mining site in Banda Sub-County
No machinery for support
This sudden reduction in the number of miners has partly been attributed to the lack of machinery to crash the hard rocks covering deeper gold deposits. Previously the artisanal miners operating in this area would use rudimentary tools like the hoe, shovel, spades and axes to extract the gold which was near the surface but this kind of method can no longer facilitate the miners to acquire the gold from the deeper earth.
Many former ASMs have ventured into other businesses like riding boda bodas while others lie idle. For this, Mr Muganza has called upon government to intervene by providing machinery to support the mining activities, lest there may be increase in the crime rates within the district due to many idle and unemployed youth.
Background
The sites mined in Uganda have differentiated ecologies raging from fragile aquatic areas to fertile agro-ecological zones and rocky areas and with the exception of Kisita, Kamalengera (all in Mubende), Tiira and Amonikakine mining sites (in Busia), where gold is being recovered from reefs (hard rock), most of the gold is recovered from alluvial material and potential agricultural fields. Particularly, the gold mined in Buhweju is located in small, high grade alluvial deposits around the Proterozoic basin and in the wetland ecosystems making it highly risky to environment and human health (NEMA, 2012).

Artisanal gold mining is one of the emerging informal economic activities providing alternative livelihood options to thousands of people in the world with close to 25 million artisanal miners and about 150 million people indirectly reliant on artisanal and small-scale mining.

This trade has experienced explosive growth worldwide in the recent years due to the rising value of mineral prices and the increasing difficulty of earning a living from agriculture and other rural activities. An estimated 40.5 million people were directly engaged in ASM in 2017, up to 30 million in 2014, 13 million in 1999 and 6 million in 1993.
By Josephine Nnabaale
Edited by Flavia Nalubega

Oil jobs: Government to establish Petroleum Skills Development Fund

Geoffrey Gokaka (L), Immaculate Namuleme, Kato Tonny Magembe and French Ambassador H.E Sophy Makame
Oil jobs: Government to establish Petroleum Skills Development Fund
At least $ 44.7m will be injected in the fund in the next 8 years to skill Ugandans for Oil jobs
In order to increase the number of Ugandans with appropriate qualifications and skills to take up jobs in the oil and gas sub-sector, government plans to establish a fund – the Petroleum Skills Development Fund. The fund is expected to finance trainings and skilling of Ugandans to match the skills and certifications required in the oil and gas industry.
The proposal to establish a skills development fund for the oil sub-sector is contained in the Workforce Skills Development Strategy and Plan for the oil and gas sub-sector in Uganda that was launched late 2018.
The aim of the workforce skills development strategy and plan is meant to maximise the quantity and quality of employment opportunities for Ugandans in oil, gas and other related sectors. According to the workforce skills development plan, the oil and gas subsector is expected to create at least 161,700 jobs (at peak during the construction phase of the entire planned infrastructure for the up-stream and mid-stream developments). Of these, 14,000 will be direct, 42,700 indirect and 105,000 induced jobs. Once the construction phase will be completed, there will be limited opportunities since the project(s) shall not require many people to run it. However, most Ugandans are left out in jobs due to lack of requisite skills, qualifications and certifications.
“The main impediment to employing a larger share of Ugandans in the petroleum sub-sector is a shortage of personnel with adequate education and training coupled with inadequate related work experience. The main thrust of the Ugandan national content effort shall therefore be directed at building the capabilities of Ugandan personnel for contributing effectively to petroleum operations,” the strategy paper reads in part.
A total of $ 44.7 million dollars (Approximately Shs 163 billion) will be injected into the fund in the next eight years (up to 2025). “The Petroleum Skills Development Fund will have its funds replenished by allocating a percentage of revenue generated by international oil companies (IOCs) and Engineering Procurement and Construction (EPC) contractors and/or subcontractors to dedicated training activities each year,” the strategy paper reads.
Government also plans to levy a fee of 2% payable on the total gross emoluments paid to international employees and the total gross payments made in respect of labour-only contractors, to raise money for the fund.
“In its first five years of operation, the Petroleum Skills Development Fund will be supplemented by a straightforward tax on foreign workers. Such a levy would involve a single one-off payment of $10,000 imposed on all oil & gas employers for every foreign worker brought into Uganda who is not a national of the East African Community”, the strategy reads.
According to the skills development strategy, the Ministry of Finance working in partnership with the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development will have responsibility for designing and overseeing the mechanism for verifying and collecting these funds.
The Petroleum Skills Development Fund will be overseen by the National Content Steering Committee which will constitute a separate sub-committee under the leadership of an independent Chair respected by both Government and the international oil industry.
The Petroleum Skills Development Fund will have its own dedicated bank account to maintain a clear link between revenues and funds raised from employers and funds allocated to training activities. Without this clear link, international experience shows that employers will lose confidence that funds are being utilized effectively to address their specific skills’ needs.
In addition to the funds raised through the payroll training levy and oneoff tax on foreign workers, the Petroleum Skills Development Fund will also be open to contributions from development partners or other agencies with an interest in pooling resources and contributing towards Oil & Gas skills development in Uganda.
Edward Ssekika
Oil.Uganda@actionaid.org
Edited by Flavia Nalubega

Hoima residents demand for ‘oil jobs’

Residents of Buseruka sub county, accuse SBC – a company that is constructing Hoima International Airport of coming with their workers from Kayunga to the detriment of the locals
“Early this year, When SBC Uganda Limited [A company constructing Hoima International Airport] started construction of the airport early this year, we [local people] were promised jobs. However, we only see buses ferrying workers from Hoima to here, where are the jobs they promised us,” Julius Muhumuza asks angrily. Muhumuza said that he got recommendations from local leaders to get a job as a casual laborer. However, he was never given the job.
Just like Muhumuza, Bosco Twaha another resident of Nyamasoga village, Buseruka sub-county, Hoima district complains, “I have a class A driving permit [a driving class for truck drivers]. I applied for a job as a driver but my application was turned down”.
Nyamasoga village is just adjacent to Hoima International Airport that is under construction. The airport is one of the oil-related infrastructure projects required before the country can start oil production. However, local people in Hoima have expressed their dissatisfaction with SBC Uganda Ltd – a company that was granted a contract to construct the Hoima International Airport over the failure to employ them. The locals accuse the company of deliberately locking them out of oil related jobs.
They are accusing SBC-Uganda Limited of not implementing local content policy requirements to enable locals benefit from the project. They claim that the company has considered other young people from other places of the country and that few are from within.
However, the company officials say locals have been given jobs. Currently, SBC Uganda Ltd employs a total of 664 people at the airport construction site. Out of these, the company explains that 147 people hail from Hoima district alone. Currently, most of the work at airport construction site includes clearing the bushes for the runways, operating construction machines such as excavators, drivers and other casual jobs among others.
He says the company is committed to ensure that at least 30 percent of its work force are local people.
Stanislaus Birungi, the Human Resource Manager, SBC-Uganda Limited explains that they are currently on earth works whereby the jobs are fixed, adding that most of those who come seeking for jobs do not qualify. He denies claims that the local people have been locked out of jobs.
“How many wheel loader operators do we have? How many people have heavy trucks driving permits?. Most people do not have required skills and experience. We need few mechanics and builders at the moment,” he added.
Mr. Ali Tinkamanyire, the sub-county Chairman of Buseruka attributes the local anguish to high expectations people have in the oil and gas sector. “Not everyone will be employed in the oil and gas sector,” he said. He appealed to central government to ensure that local people are trained and skilled to be able to participate in the sector.
Recently, in a new twist and out of anger, the local people ambushed the company vans transporting SBC workers and pelted them with stones.Allan Julius Hakiza, police spokesperson for oil rich Albertine region says police intervened and started escorting the vans to the construction site. “We realized that escorting the vans was not a sustainable option, we conducted community policing meetings in those villages, where we explained to the local people to be patient or look for other options of benefiting from the sector. Not everybody is going to be employed in the oil and gas sector,” Hakiza said.
The locals say, most of the workers at the airport construction site hail from Kayunga district where SBC Uganda has been constructing a road. “SBC has come with their people from Kayunga. This is unacceptable,” Muhumuza says angrily.
Edward Ssekika
Oil.Uganda@actionaid.org

Museveni orders foreigners to vacate gold mines of Mubende and Kasanda

The President of Uganda, Yoweri Kaguta Museveni has ordered foreigners who had flocked the gold mines in Mubende and Kasanda districts to vacate these areas on grounds that foreign countries were benefiting more from the trade in gold compared to Ugandans.
President Museveni expressed this during the Youth day celebrations on 16th November 2018 at Umea Primary School in Kikandwa village, Kalwana sub-county, Kasanda district where thousands of artisanal and small scale gold miners were evicted last year, and remain unemployed to-date.
Museveni said that the eviction of the artisanal and small-scale miners from the gold mines in Mubende district in August 2017 was inevitable because foreign countries were gaining from the mines more than Uganda. According to him, many of the miners in the Mubende gold mines were non-citizens which made government lose out in terms of revenue.
“The Congolese, Rwandese and Tanzanians who had come here for gold should first leave the country. Forests, lakes, rivers, gold and other minerals below the ground belong to all Ugandans. Individuals are not allowed to utilise these deposits without the consent of government who is the sole manager of these treasures. Unfortunately these artisanal miners went ahead to invade the gold mines in Mubende district, which had been licensed to AUC Mining company thus destabilizing their activities,” Museveni said.
He insists that artisanal and small-scale miners have been a huge hindrance to the investor and government cannot therefore look on while resources meant to benefit all Ugandans are taken by the people from foreign countries and a few Ugandans. “We cannot accept the artisanal and small-scale miners to destabilize the investor who legally has a license.”
Genesis
Artisanal and small-scale miners who were evicted from the Mubende gold mines for the past one year and three months have made several efforts to return to the gold mines and the President made a directive for these miners to receive 30% part of the exploration license area but up to-date they have not yet returned to the gold mines.
The eviction of the artisanal and small-scale miners came up following the presidential directive to evict them from Mubende gold mines on grounds that they not registered, government did not know the amount of gold they are getting out from this area, the miners operating in those areas were not Ugandans and that there was increased environmental degradation which is a threat to the nearby communities.
However, the then Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development, Dr. Stephen R. Isabalijja in the letter dated 02/August/2017 entitled statement on illegal mining activities in Uganda, explained that government is putting in place strict measures whereby all the local artisanal and small-scale miners would be registered in all mining areas of Kitumbi and Bukuya sub-counties so that they can be organised into groups that shall ultimately be well regulated.
In order to achieve the above, the miners were ruthlessly evicted thereby leading to huge losses on their part and they have never recovered from the same.
Josephine Nabbaale
Oil.Uganda@actionaid.org

Tilenga Project: Government to conduct public oil hearings

Government has accepted to hold two public hearings over the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) report for the Tilenga oil project.

The public is hereby notified that the Petroleum Authority of Uganda (PAU) has been requested by the National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) to hold public hearings for the Environmental and Social impact Assessment report for the proposed Tilenga project, a statement released by PAU last evening reads in part.

The name Tilenga is derived from two local names for the Uganda Kob (Antelope) which is called “Til” in Acholi and “Engabi” in Runyoro-Rutoro.

NEMA received the ESIA from Total E&P Uganda and Tullow Uganda operations Pty Ltd for the proposed Tilenga project.

Under the Tilenga project, the Government through its licensed oil companies has discovered commercially viable oil deposits north of Victoria Nile in Murchison falls national park and south of Victoria Nile in Buliisa district.

The project includes jobi-Rii, Gunya, Ngiri, Kasemene, wahrindi, Nsoga, Kigogole oil fields.
In 2016, Government granted petroleum production licenses to Total Exploration and Production Uganda B.V (TEPU) and Tullow Uganda operations Pty Ltd (TUOP) to develop and operate upstream petroleum facilities in the Albertine graben.
Oil Licenses

TEPU was granted production licenses for Ngiri, Jobi-Rii, Gunya fields while TUOP was granted production licenses in Mputa,Nzizi,Waraga, Kasemene, Wahrindi, Kigogole-Ngara,Nsoga and Ngege fields.

The development of six fields namely Ngiri, Jobi-Rii, Gunya, Kigogole and Kasemene-Wahrindi within Buliisa and Nwoya districts will form part of the Tilenga project.

The Tilenga project will be funded by TEPU, TUOP, CNOOC Uganda Ltd and Uganda National Oil Company.

Composition
According to the project documents which oil in Uganda has seen, the Tilenga project is composed of well pads, a central processing facility and other associated facilities, production and injection network of pipelines and cables, Bugungu airstrip, Tangi operation camp, a water abstraction system, victoria Nile crossing, river Nile pipe crossing and some roads.

The project also includes temporary construction camps, construction support base, a logistical check point in Masindi and borrow pits.
NEMA’s notice

Oil in Uganda reported this week how the National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) is seeking public comments on ESIA for the Tilenga project.

A public hearing will be a forum in which relevant stakeholders and developers will be brought together to express opinions and offer suggestions on the proposed project to influence the decision making process during the ESIA approval.

The hearings will be held in accordance with regulation 22 of the National Environment impact Assessment regulations 1998, the statement added.

A public notice released by the NEMA Executive director Dr Tom Okurut informed the public that the outcomes of the public review will contribute towards making a final decision of the project in accordance with the Environment impact assessment regulations.

The notice asked members of the public to submit their comments by November 9th 2018.

Concern of CSOs
However, 13 CSOs demanded for public hearings over the project.

“It is through public hearings that oil host and affected communities, the poor, marginalised and illiterate will be able to make comments on the ESIA to enable NEMA make a decision based on the collective input of all concerned stakeholders” the CSOs said in a joint letter to the NEMA executive Director Dr Tom Okurut.

The CSOs said they are concerned that in the notice, NEMA did not indicate that it will call for public hearings before making any decision on the ESIA.

The concerns of the CSOs are contained in a letter dated October 17, 2018 which was submitted to NEMA by the AFIEGO Chief Executive Director Dickens Kamugisha on behalf of the CSOs.

The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Regulations of 1998 mandate NEMA to call for a public hearing where there is controversy or where a project has trans boundary impacts, the CSOs argued.

“We need public hearings to ensure effective public consultations that can build consensus not only among Ugandan stakeholders but also stakeholders across the borders who are likely to be affected by the Tilenga project” said Kamugisha, a lawyer.
Hearings

Gloria Ssebikari, a senior communication officer at the the Petroleum Authority of Uganda (PAU), PAU will conduct two public hearings this month.

“The public is further notified that there will be two public hearings held on 12th November 2018 at Buliisa district headquarters and on 15th November 2018 at Gotapwoyo primary school, Gptapwoyo subcounty, Nwoya district from 9am to 5 pm” the notice reads in part.

The notice indicated that public comments should be addressed to the presiding officer at PAU.

Local communities fear that oil developments in an ecologically fragile area in Murchison falls national park and around the Nile delta could potentially affect the environment.
The national park is one of Uganda’s leading tourism destinations and it hosts thousands of wild endangered species of animals, birds, insects and reptiles.

River Nile waters are shared by Uganda, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Burundi, South Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Egypt and DRC.

The CSOs have asked government to establish a multi-stakeholder committee comprised of actors from government, the private sector, religious and cultural groups, CSOs, the academia and others to act as an independent multidisciplinary oversight body to promote compliance with environmental conservation tools such as EIA, SEA, ESIA.

The CSOs have further asked NEMA to delay any decision to issue a certificate of approval for the Tilenga ESIA until the new environmental laws and regulations are put in place by government and parliament.
This will help the country to stop engaging in oil activities based on a weak and outdated environmental legal framework, the petition added.

The CSOS that petitioned include the Africa institute for Energy Governance (AFIEGO), National Association of Professional Environmentalists (NAPE), Environmental Conservation Trust of Uganda (ECOTRUST), Guild Presidents Forum on Oil Governance (GPFOG), Center for Constitutional Governance (CCG), South Western Center for Policy and Advocacy (SOWIPA), World Voices Uganda (WVU), Community Transformation Foundation Network (COTFONE), Greater, Green Organisation Africa (GOA)-Masindi, Oil Refinery Residents Association (ORRA)-Hoima, Kakindo Orphans Care-Buliisa, Girl Power foundation-Kasese, Friends of Nature-Kasese.

Fears of Environmental damage

The study released by the worldwide fund for nature (WWF) and the civil society Coalition on oil and gas (CSCO) titled “Safeguarding People & nature in the East African Crude Oil (EACOP) Pipeline,” expresses fears of a possible pollution of fresh water pollution in the Lake Victoria basin.

According to a study, the East African crude oil pipeline will cross Kagera River, the largest river flowing into Lake Victoria.

“The probability of leakage and spillage within the Lake Victoria watershed area is even greater given it is an active seismic area” the report stated.

The report was released in July 2017 as a preliminary Threat Analysis (PTA) of the East Africa Crude Oil Pipeline (EACOP).

The Crude oil covering 1,445 km will transport crude oil from Hoima district in Western Uganda to Tanga port in Tanzania.

The Pipeline project was commissioned by President Museveni And his Tanzanian counterpart John Pombe Magufuli in November 2017,.

By Oil in Uganda correspondent, Bunyoro
Edited by Flavia Nalubega

NEMA reviews environmental concerns over Tilenga project

The National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) is seeking public comments on the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) report for the Tilenga oil project.

The name Tilenga is derived from two local names for the Uganda Kob (Antelope) which is called “Til” in Acholi and “Engabi” in Runyoro-Rotoro.

A notice which has been pinned on public notice boards in Buliisa district indicates that NEMA received the ESIA from Total E&P Uganda and Tullow Uganda operations Pty Ltd for the proposed Tilenga project.

Under the Tilenga project, the Government through its licensed oil companies has discovered commercially viable oil deposits north of Victoria Nile in Murchison falls national park and south of Victoria Nile in Buliisa district.

The project includes jobi-Rii, Gunya, Ngiri, Kasemene, wahrindi, Nsoga, Kigogole oil fields.
Composition
According to the project documents which oil in Uganda has seen, the Tilenga project is composed of well pads, a central processing facility and other associated facilities, production and injection network of pipelines and cables, Bugungu airstrip, Tangi operation camp, a water abstraction system, victoria Nile crossing, river Nile pipe crossing and some roads.

The project also includes temporary construction camps, construction support base, a logistical check point in Masindi and borrow pits.

“The public is further notified that the outcomes of the public review will contribute towards making a final decision of the project in accordance with the Environment impact assessment regulations” a notice released by the NEMA Executive director Dr Tom Okurut reads in part.

According to the notice, members of the public have been asked to submit their comments by November 9th 2018.
CSO Petition
13 civil society organisations have asked NEMA to hold public hearings to enable locals have an input in the studies.

“It is through public hearings that oil host and affected communities, the poor, marginalised and illiterate will be able to make comments on the ESIA to enable NEMA make a decision based on the collective input of all concerned stakeholders” the CSOs said in a joint letter to the NEMA executive Director.

According to the CSOs which are working to prevent the impacts of oil on biodiversity from Buliisa, Hoima, Kasese, Greater Masaka, South Western Uganda and Kampala, they are concerned that in the notice, NEMA did not indicate that it will call for public hearings before making any decision on the ESIA.

The concerns of the CSOs are contained in a letter dated October 17, 2018 which was submitted to NEMA by the AFIEGO Chief Executive Director on behalf of the CSOs.

The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Regulations of 1998 mandate NEMA to call for a public hearing where there is controversy or where a project has trans boundary impacts, the CSOs argued.

“The Tilenga oil project is controversial and will have trans boundary impacts. The project’s activities will include drawing of water from Lake Albert, whose boundaries remain a challenge between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). It should be noted that even the existence of many agreements including the Uganda Zaire 1990 Agreement, the 2007 Uganda-DRC Ngurdoto Agreement and others whose main objective was to address the peace and security challenges in the Uganda-DRC border areas through among other things providing for a framework for benefit sharing and conservation of shared resources such as the Lake Albert waters, fish and others have failed to achieve lasting results” Dickens Kamugisha, the Chief Executive officer of the Africa institute for Energy Governance(AFIEGO).

The CSOs warned that if the Tilenga project is not well handled, it may worsen the conflicts and loss of lives as well as environmental destruction in Uganda and the DRC.

“We need public hearings to ensure effective public consultations that can build consensus not only among Ugandan stakeholders but also stakeholders across the borders who are likely to be affected by the Tilenga project” said Kamugisha, a lawyer.

The CSO stated that available evidence indicates that NEMA has the skills and interest to do a good job but it cannot effectively play its role amidst weak and outdated laws.

It is unfortunate that for over four years, government and parliament have failed or ignored the need to complete the enactment and formulation of the new environmental laws such as the National Environment Bill of 2017, the draft EIA and Strategic Environment Assessment (SEA) regulations of 2017, the Uganda Wildlife Bill and others. Without such relevant laws to among other things improve NEMA’s independence, funding, penalties for environmental offenders, the CSOS stated in their five-paged petition to NEMA.

It is especially unfortunate that todate, as government and oil companies are finalising major oil decisions that will have long lasting environmental and social impacts, there is no specific provision in our current laws including the 1995 National Environment Act, the Uganda Wildlife Act and others that specifically provides for NEMA to reject oil activities even in the most critical biodiversity areas such as Lake Albert, River Nile, Budongo Forest, Murchison Falls National Park, and others of national and international importance, the petition which was received and stamped by NEMA on 18th October reads in part.
Demands

“NEMA should use its powers not to issue any certificate of approval for oil projects as a condition to force parliament and government to complete the new environmental laws and regulations” the petition stated.

The CSOs have asked government to establish a multi-stakeholder committee comprised of actors from government, the private sector, religious and cultural groups, CSOs, the academia and others to act as an independent multidisciplinary oversight body to promote compliance with environmental conservation tools such as EIA, SEA, ESIA.

The CSOs have further asked NEMA to delay any decision to issue a certificate of approval for the Tilenga ESIA until the new environmental laws and regulations are put in place by government and parliament.
This will help the country to stop engaging in oil activities based on a weak and outdated environmental legal framework, the petition added.

The CSOS that petitioned include the Africa institute for Energy Governance (AFIEGO), National Association of Professional Environmentalists (NAPE), Environmental Conservation Trust of Uganda (ECOTRUST), Guild Presidents Forum on Oil Governance (GPFOG), Center for Constitutional Governance (CCG), South Western Center for Policy and Advocacy (SOWIPA), World Voices Uganda (WVU), Community Transformation Foundation Network (COTFONE), Greater, Green Organisation Africa (GOA)-Masindi, Oil Refinery Residents Association (ORRA)-Hoima, Kakindo Orphans Care-Buliisa, Girl Power foundation-Kasese, Friends of Nature-Kasese.

By Oil in Uganda correspondent, Bunyoro

NEMA reviews environmental concerns over Tilenga project

The National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) is seeking public comments on the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) report for the Tilenga oil project.

The name Tilenga is derived from two local names for the Uganda Kob (Antelope) which is called “Til” in Acholi and “Engabi” in Runyoro-Rotoro.

A notice which has been pinned on public notice boards in Buliisa district indicates that NEMA received the ESIA from Total E&P Uganda and Tullow Uganda operations Pty Ltd for the proposed Tilenga project.

Under the Tilenga project, the Government through its licensed oil companies has discovered commercially viable oil deposits north of Victoria Nile in Murchison falls national park and south of Victoria Nile in Buliisa district.

The project includes jobi-Rii, Gunya, Ngiri, Kasemene, wahrindi, Nsoga, Kigogole oil fields.
Composition
According to the project documents which oil in Uganda has seen, the Tilenga project is composed of well pads, a central processing facility and other associated facilities, production and injection network of pipelines and cables, Bugungu airstrip, Tangi operation camp, a water abstraction system, victoria Nile crossing, river Nile pipe crossing and some roads.

The project also includes temporary construction camps, construction support base, a logistical check point in Masindi and borrow pits.

“The public is further notified that the outcomes of the public review will contribute towards making a final decision of the project in accordance with the Environment impact assessment regulations” a notice released by the NEMA Executive Director Tom Okurut reads in part.

According to the notice, members of the public have been asked to submit their comments by November 9th 2018.
CSO Petition NEMA
13 civil society organisations have asked NEMA to hold public hearings to enable locals have an input in the studies.

“It is through public hearings that oil host and affected communities, the poor, marginalised and illiterate will be able to make comments on the ESIA to enable NEMA make a decision based on the collective input of all concerned stakeholders” the CSOs said in a joint letter to the NEMA executive Director.

According to the CSOs which are working to prevent the impacts of oil on biodiversity from Buliisa, Hoima, Kasese, Greater Masaka, South Western Uganda and Kampala, they are concerned that in the notice, NEMA did not indicate that it will call for public hearings before making any decision on the ESIA.

The concerns of the CSOs are contained in a letter dated October 17, 2018 which was submitted to NEMA by the AFIEGO Chief Executive Director on behalf of the CSOs.

The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Regulations of 1998 mandates NEMA to call for a public hearing where there is controversy or where a project has trans boundary impacts, the CSOs argued.

“The Tilenga oil project is controversial and will have trans boundary impacts. The project’s activities will include drawing of water from Lake Albert, whose boundaries remain a challenge between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). It should be noted that even the existence of many agreements including the Uganda Zaire 1990 Agreement, the 2007 Uganda-DRC Ngurdoto Agreement and others whose main objective was to address the peace and security challenges in the Uganda-DRC border areas through among other things providing for a framework for benefit sharing and conservation of shared resources such as the Lake Albert waters, fish and others have failed to achieve lasting results” Dickens Kamugisha, the Chief Executive officer of the Africa institute for Energy Governance(AFIEGO) said.

The CSOs warned that if the Tilenga project is not well handled, it may worsen the conflicts and loss of lives as well as environmental destruction in Uganda and the DRC.

“We need public hearings to ensure effective public consultations that can build consensus not only among Ugandan stakeholders but also stakeholders across the borders who are likely to be affected by the Tilenga project” said Kamugisha, a lawyer.

The CSO stated that available evidence indicates that NEMA has the skills and interest to do a good job but it cannot effectively play its role amidst weak and outdated laws.

It is unfortunate that for over four years, government and parliament have failed or ignored the need to complete the enactment and formulation of the new environmental laws such as the National Environment Bill of 2017, the draft EIA and Strategic Environment Assessment (SEA) regulations of 2017, the Uganda Wildlife Bill and others. Without such relevant laws to improve NEMA’s independence, funding and penalties for environmental offenders, NEMA can hardly operate rightfully.

‘It is especially unfortunate that todate, as government and oil companies are finalising major oil decisions that will have long lasting environmental and social impacts, there is no specific provision in our current laws including the 1995 National Environment Act, the Uganda Wildlife Act and others that specifically provides for NEMA to reject oil activities even in the most critical biodiversity areas such as Lake Albert, River Nile, Budongo Forest, Murchison Falls National Park, and others of national and international importance,” the petition which was received and stamped by NEMA on 18th October reads in part.
Demands

“NEMA should use its powers not to issue any certificate of approval for oil projects as a condition to force parliament and government to complete the new environmental laws and regulations” the petition stated.

The CSOs have asked government to establish a multi-stakeholder committee comprised of actors from government, the private sector, religious and cultural groups, CSOs, the academia and others to act as an independent multidisciplinary oversight body to promote compliance with environmental conservation tools such as EIA, SEA, ESIA.

The CSOs have further asked NEMA to delay any decision to issue a certificate of approval for the Tilenga ESIA until the new environmental laws and regulations are put in place by government and parliament.
This will help the country to stop engaging in oil activities based on a weak and outdated environmental legal framework, the petition added.

By Oil in Uganda correspondent, Bunyoro

Mineral Wealth Conference 2018

Happening every October, in Kampala, the Mineral Wealth Conference (MWC) has become East Africa’s principal annual mining event. It plays a critical role in creating opportunities for Uganda’s domestic and international mining interests. Launched in 2012 following a partnership between the Uganda Chamber of Mines & Petroleum and the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development, the MWC has become one of the largely attended events on Uganda and East Africa’s mining calendar. The objective is to provide an opportunity for major mineral exploration and mining companies to not only invest in Uganda’s promising mining sector, but to also build joint venture partnerships with local players. It brings together key policy and decision makers, business leaders, bankers, academics and mining investors from all over the world.

This year, 2018, the conference was organized under the theme ‘Eastern Africa, the continent’s next mining haven’, on 2nd and 3rd of October. It attracted participants across the globe and it was graced by Permanent Secretary for Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development Robert Kasande, Head of Delegation of the EU to Uganda, Commissioner Zachary Baguma, the Director in the Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines, among others. Here are some of the snippets into the conference captured in camera.

 

Flavia Nalubega

Oil.Uganda@actionaid.org

Africa Inaugural Global ASM Conference on Development Minerals confirms these minerals as the engine of Africa’s industrialization and modernization

Meeting of ASMs in Zambia discussing the viability of Development minerals.

On September 11‐13 Zambia hosted the inaugural International Conference on Artisanal and Small‐scale Mining & Quarrying (ASM18) on development minerals.

Over 450 delegates in attendance partook of a global dialogue about development opportunities and challenges of artisanal and small scale miners and to share visions of the future for the sub sector.

It was a landmark conference recognizing the potential of development minerals as the engine of Africa’s industrialization and modernization. Development minerals include industrial minerals, construction materials, dimension stones and semi-precious stones, agro minerals like phosphates and vermiculite, among others.

The conference, an initiative of the ACP‐EU Development Minerals Programme, aimed to improve the management of development minerals while building knowledge and awareness about them. Uganda is one of six focus countries for the ACP‐EU Development Minerals Programme whose activities include training; small grants and partnership building to strengthen development minerals value chain.

Uganda’s new Mineral and Mining Policy 2018, approved by cabinet and is currently undergoing final review, recognizes the importance of development minerals in boosting the economy through industrialization. The Policy recognizes these as minerals and aims to realize their economic potential.

The country has in the past few years realized a surge of foreign investors, particularly Chinese, venturing into lucrative sand mining which has made national headlines and drawn the fury of local leaders. The activity has gone on unregulated and experts have cited environmental implications if sand mining trade continues to be unregulated.

According to a baseline assessment of development minerals in Uganda, March 2018, up to 400,000 Ugandans who are directly employed in ASM production of development minerals are 3% of the working age population. And again, whereas 84% of development minerals extraction is attributed to ASM, the significant contributions of the ASM development minerals sector to local economies and employment  go largely undocumented. 

Opportunities

With an infant oil and gas industry in Uganda that majorly requires highly technical skills and specialized knowledge and agricultural sector that is largely subsistence, the ASM sector provides immense opportunities for employment and growth due to its inclusiveness. Uganda’s population is tending to 40m with unflattering unemployment figures; yet, over 60% of the population in their youth. ASM provides a rich policy ground for promoting a good job agenda.

By Robert Mwesigye

Oil.Uganda@actionaid.org