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Environment

  • Image: Ghana's FPSO

    Ghana: the environmental costs of oil

    The Kwame Nkrumah Floating Production, Storage and Offloading facility in Ghana’s offshore Jubilee Field, operated by Tullow and partners. The powerful lights attract fish into a ‘safety zone’ that local fishermen cannot enter, and some fishermen complain of health problems associated with excessive gas flaring. (Photo: Tom Fowler)

    Oil production worldwide has been synonymous with environmental damage, and Ghana is proving to be no exception. Oil in Uganda staff writer, Chris Musiime, reports from Takoradi, Ghana’s coastal ‘oil city,’ two hundred kilometres south west of Accra.

    Oil production 60 kilometres offshore has created problems for the environment and the locals, according to Solomon Kusi Ampofo, the Program Officer in charge of the Extractives Industry at Friends of the Nation (FON), an environmental NGO based in Takoradi.

    “Since the exploration and subsequent production of oil, nine whales have been washed ashore the coast in Jomoro and Ellembelle Districts,” he says.  Read More

  • Image: Buliisa lakeshore

    NGOs encourage Albertine communities to monitor environment

    Buliisa District: Local people in the oil producing areas should be front line monitors of environmental change, say green NGOs (Photo: Stephen Wandera)

    As Uganda moves closer to oil production, a number of civil society organizations are working with communities in the oil-rich areas to help them monitor and mitigate adverse impacts on their environment.

    One such group is the National Association for Professional Environmentalists (NAPE), whose Executive Director, Frank Muramazi, says that as early as 2008 the NGO carried out research in Buliisa, Hoima, Mubende and Kiryandongo districts and found that local citizens were largely ignorant of potential threats to water bodies and environmentally sensitive areas, including national parks and game reserves.

    “If these resources are not exploited sustainably, the local people will eventually lose out,” says Muramazi. Read More

  • Douglas Oluoch points to where Heritage buried oil waste

    Heritage Oil malpractice reveals waste management flaws

    Douglas Oluoch points to where Heritage buried oil drilling wastes on his farm (Photo: NY)

    A farmer who says that Heritage Oil dumped dozens of truckloads of waste in a pit dug on his land, a few kilometres north of Murchison Falls National Park, is still waiting for the National Environmental Management Authority  (NEMA) to give him the results of tests they conducted in 2009, and for the waste to be removed for permanent disposal elsewhere.

    Douglas Oluoch, 43, relates that he first came into contact with Heritage in his capacity as a local councillor (LC II) in Purongo sub-county of what is now Nwoya District.  In 2008, he says, a Heritage official, who he can identify only as “Albert,” offered to pay him for accepting waste from exploration wells dug within the National Park.

    Oluoch told Oil in Uganda that he received 750,000 shillings (USD 300) for accepting the waste, adding that “They said it was not harmful and would act as a fertiliser.” Read More